SPIRIT WILL WIN

                                       By

  Charles W. Shirriff      (March 2007)

 

FADE IN

 

INT. GREYHOUND BUS STATION -- EVENING

TITLES RUN

Typical big city bus terminal with people sitting and milling around.

JAY (scruffy 17 year-old in raggedy but clean clothes) wanders around aimlessly.  Jay starts to leave - returns, sits on a deserted bench - looks lost and scared - gnaws at his thumb nail - stares at the floor - looks around - closes his eyes.

FADE TO SEPIA:

EXT. FOREST CLEARING WITH LAKE & ASPENS -- DAY

A younger Jay stands with an old 40-40 rifle - holds up one finger to test wind direction - angles downwind through the underbrush.

A herd of white-tailed deer comes to drink.

Jay moves closer - sights on an eight-point buck feeding.

The buck raises its head - sniffs.

Jay aims - his finger tightens on the trigger.

The SCREAM of a circling eagle shatters the silence.

The buck rears up - Jay lowers the rifle - the buck disappears into the woods - Jay walks to the cabin followed by the Eagle flying above him.

DISSOLVE BACK TO COLOR:

INT. GREYHOUND BUS STATION -- CONTINUOUS

PHIL (late twenties, big biker type, bushy red hair and full beard) strolls in and ambles around. Camera locks onto Phil's eyes.  His eyes are darting from side to side.  He flops onto the bench two feet away from Jay.

PHIL

Hi kid.  You ok?

Jay looks up with a start.

JAY (SCARED)

Yeah.  Why?

PHIL

You look lost.

JAY (STARING STRAIGHT AHEAD)

I'm not.

PHIL

You need a ride somewhere?

JAY

No.

Jay clenches his teeth.

JAY (TO HIMSELF) (CONT'D)

Just go away and leave me alone.

PHIL

You got a place to go?

JAY

I'm OK.

PHIL

At least let me get you a bite to eat.

Jay slides off the bench and begins to walk away.

PHIL (CONT'D)

Hey.  Come on fella.  I hate eating alone.

JAY (TURNING BACK)

OK.  But don't expect me to talk to you.

CUT TO:

INT. SMALL RESTAURANT -- MOMENTS LATER

The WAITRESS stands taking their order.

JAY

I'll have a burger with fries.

Jay looks up to gauge Phil's reaction.

JAY (CONT'D)

And a chocolate milk shake

(beat))

And a slice of pie

(beat)

With ice cream.

PHIL

You new here?

JAY

Yeah.

PHIL

You have relatives here?

JAY

Of course.  I just don't know where they live.

PHIL

You have place to sleep tonight?

JAY

I'll be O.K. I can sleep anywhere.

PHIL

You could stay at my place for the night.  And then find your relatives tomorrow.

JAY

I don't think so.

Phil put a bill and some changer on the table.

PHIL

Really.  It'd be OK. You have to sleep somewhere.

JAY

OK.  Just for tonight.  And don't get any funny ideas.

PHIL (SMILING)

I'll be on my best behavior.

Phil gets up and walks away from the booth.

Jay slips the tip money into his pocket as he gets up and follows Phil.

DISSOLVE TO:

INT. PHIL'S APARTMENT -- EVENING

Phil and Jay enter the room.  Phil locks the door from the inside with a key and pockets the key.  Jay's face shows panic as he notices bars on the windows.

A white leather recliner sits in front of a small, old TV.  The other furnishings look like leftovers from garage sales.

A threadbare sofa separates the kitchen from the living room.

PHIL (POINTING TO SOFA)

The sofa's yours for the night, Joe.  It folds out into a bed.

JAY

Thanks.

PHIL (POINTING)

Bathroom's there.

Phil gestures toward one closed door.

PHIL (CONT'D)

My bedroom's here.

Jay looks toward a blue painted door.

JAY

And what's behind door number three?

PHIL (WITH ANNOYANCE)

That's none of your concern.

Jay looks around the room.

JAY (lamely)

Nice place you have here.  Look, maybe I shouldn't stay.  I don't have a towel, or soap or anything.

PHIL

You didn't bring anything with you?

JAY

Of course I did.  My mother even packed me a lunch.  But it got stolen on the way here.  While I was asleep.

Phil returns from the bathroom with a bar of soap, a tattered grey towel and a thick, black washcloth - hands them to Jay.

PHIL

Here.  Be careful with the washcloth.  It's one of my good ones.  And don't touch any of my personal stuff.

JAY (ATTEMPTING HUMOR)

Is it okay if I use a tiny little bit of the toilet paper?

PHIL (GLARING)

Yeah.  And a little cologne or shampoo if you need it.  But nothing personal like my scissors or razor or anything sharp.  Using another man's razor can be dangerous to your health.

JAY

I'll need to shave.

PHIL

Not with my razor, you don't.

JAY

How am I supposed to shave, then?  You know I don't have a razor.

Phil scrutinizes Jay's face.

PHIL

Soap and water should take that peach fuzz off easy enough.  Or grow a beard for all I care.  It's your problem, not mine.

JAY

Take it easy.  I was joking, honest. 

PHIL

I've gotta go out for some groceries.  Anything you want me to get for you?

JAY

No thanks.  I'll manage.

Phil glares and nods in acknowledgment - leaves the apartment - loud CLICK as the deadbolt locks from the outside.

Jay examines the lock - looks at the barred windows - tries the door to the bedroom and blue door steps back and kicks the door.  THUMP.  The door shakes.

Jay kicks again but misses the door and hits the frame - THUMP - grabs his hurt foot and hops around the room.

Jay sulks in the leather chair - surfs through the channels.

DISSOLVE TO:

INT. PHIL'S APARTMENT -- LATER

Jay is watching TV - hears CLICK of the lock - jumps up - darts around hefting objects to use as a weapon - chooses a small statue - stands beside the door - raises statue above his head ready to strike.

The door opens - Phil steps in.

Jay loses his nerve - turns - puts the statue on a table.

JAY

Hi.  Can I take that bag for you?

Phil looks suspiciously at the statue.

PHIL

You been waiting just to give me a hand with the groceries?

Phil hands a grocery bag to Jay.

JAY (SARCASTICALLY)

What else was I supposed to do?  It's not as if I could go out for a walk or anything.

PHIL (BAITING JAY)

What's the matter, country boy?  Don't you know how to open a door?

JAY (ANGRILY)

You locked it, and you didn't give me a key.  There are bars on the windows.  This is place is like a jail cell.  I couldn't escape even if the place was on fire.

PHIL

Hey kid.  Lighten up.  If I'd given you a key you'd have run out on me.

JAY

I have no money and nowhere to go.  And now it's night and dark out.  I have to stay here tonight.  You know that.

PHIL

Sorry, Joe.  I didn't mean to scare you.  I'm an all right guy.  See, I even bought you a razor.

Phil pulls a disposable razor and shaving cream from one of the bags and set them on the table in front of Jay.

JAY (WITH ANNOYANCE)

And stop calling me Joe.  My name's Jay.  H...I...J. Get it?  Jay.  Where do you get off with calling me Joe? 

PHIL

Hey.  Sorry.  I thought you said it was Joe.  My mistake.

He shakes his head in confusion.

PHIL (CONT'D)

Jay it is.  So whatcha want to eat, Jay?

JAY

Whatever you're having.  I don't want to be any bother.

Jay plops into the leather chair.  After a moment he gets up with a guilty look - moves over to the sofa.

SIZZLING sound of stir-fry.

Jay gets up - walks toward the kitchen.

CUT TO:

INT. PHIL'S KITCHEN -- CONTINUOUS

Jay sits at the table.  Phil slides a serving of oily stir-fry onto two cheap plastic plates - puts one on the table in front of Jay.

JAY

Fork?

PHIL

Pardon me.

JAY

Fork.  I need a fork.

PHIL

Chopsticks.

JAY

Excuse me?  Chop what?

PHIL

Chop sticks.  You eat stir-fry with chopsticks so that it doesn't pick up the metal taste.

Phil points to a pair of chop sticks.

JAY

I know what they are.  I've seen pictures of them.  I didn't think that real people used them.  Only those guys in China or Japan.  You know, places like that.

Jay picks up one of the chopsticks and attempts to spear the food - struggles with it.

PHIL

You have to use both of them together.

Jay takes one stick in each hand and tries to scoop up a mouthful of food - it slides away - he stabs at it.

PHIL (CONT'D)

Like this.

Phil demonstrates.

Jay tries again - gets a few morsels close to his mouth before they fall half onto his plate and half onto the table - Puts his mouth at the edge of his plate and slides a bit of food into his mouth.

JAY

Where's the meat?  We always have meat on the table.  Might be only a rabbit if the deer hunting was poor.  Or at th very least, a squirrel.  They aren't good, but they are something to eat.

PHIL

I'm a vegetarian.

JAY (TRYING TO BE FUNNY)

You say you're a veterinarian?  What does that have to do with not eating meat?  You don't want to eat your patients?

PHIL

Not veterinarian.  Vegetarian.  I don't eat meat, ever.

JAY

Never?  No meat at all?  What about fish?

PHIL

No meat, no fish, no chicken.

JAY

But you bought me a burger.  That was meat.  Maybe not very good meat, but it was meat.

PHIL

I was trying to be friendly.

JAY (SPIIUY)

Why would you want to be friendly to me?

PHIL

Because I'm a nice guy.

JAY

Why?

PHIL

I can't help it.  It's just the way I am.

(beat)

You reminded me of someone I used to know.

They finish eating - wash dishes - Jay dries.

PHIL (CONT'D)

Neatness and cleanliness are two things a guy's got to have.  Don't ever put off the cleaning and tidying

JAY

I can handle that.  Do you have any other gems of wisdom for me?

PHIL

Sure.  Never look a stranger, or a strange dog, in the eye.  Don't step on the flowers as you go through life.  And if you look after the little things, the big things will look after themselves.

CUT TO:

INT.  PHIL'S APARTMENT - 3 A.M.

Jay is asleep on the unopened sofa - street light shines through the window.

Muffled VOICES from the hallway - KNOCKING on the door.

Jay rolls off the sofa.

JAY

Who's there?

STEVE (O.S.)

(with affected emphasis)

Never mind who's out here.  Who's that in there?

Jay goes to the bedroom door - tries to open it - knocks quietly.

JAY

Hey.  There are people at the door.  Should I let them in?

Jay returns to the hall door.

JAY (CONT'D)

Hang on a minute.

He turns away from the door.

JAY (to himself) (CONT'D)

Or an hour, or maybe forever for all I know

STEVE (O.S.)

Well, let me in, dearie.  I can't stand out here all night, you know. 

JAY (LOOKING AT THE DOOR)

Okay, Okay.  Give us a minute.

Phil comes in - walks up behind Jay.

Jay jumps out of the way.

JAY (CONT'D)

(to himself)

I wish you'd quit doing that.

Phil unlocks and opens the door.

STEVE, mid-twenties, buff six foot, buzzed blond hair, wearing makeup, face jewelry, open shirt, leather vest, silver chains - silver trimmed cowboy boots, enters.

STEVE

"Well, it's just about time.  Really.  I've been just dying of thirst out there, forever.

Steve looks Phil up and down.

STEVE (CONT'D)

It's so good to see you again, Phil.  You look absolutely fabulous.  Maybe two pounds heavier.  You must tell me just everything about your marvelous trip.  And who is this gorgeous young man?  Really.

Steve takes a superficial puff on his cigarette - looks Jay up and down.

STEVE (OFFERING JAY A CIGARETTE) (CONT'D)

Care for one?

JAY

No.  I don't have any bad habits.  Cigarettes are evil.

Jay retreats in confusion to the kitchen.

STEVE

I didn't know you had gone on a hunting trip, but my goodness, what a trophy.  Could I get a glass of Perrier, or something?  

Steve blows a puff of smoke into the air.

STEVE (CONT'D)

You don't mind if I smoke, do you?  It's just awful that one can't smoke in the cabs any more.  And those cabbies are so rude.  Just one little cigarette and they just simply shout at you as if they owned the cab.  Be a dear and get me that drink, will you?"

PHIL (CALLING TO JAY)

Bring Steve a glass of apple juice, please, Jay.

Jay returns from the kitchen with a glass of juice - hands it to Steve.

JAY

Here's your drink.

Steve leans back - arms along the back of the sofa - catches Jay's eye - looks him up and down  - takes the glass - fingers brush against Jay's hand - smiles slightly - takes a tiny sip - runs his tongue slowly over his lips.

Jay alternates between anger and panic - takes a chair off to the side. 

Steve turns his chair to see Jay.

PHIL

Knock it off, Steve.  He's my nephew.  I promised his mom I'd look after him for a few days.  I should warn you that he knows Judo, has a hair-trigger temper and he doesn't take anything from anybody.  So just back off and leave him alone.

Jay gives Phil a surprised look - Phil winks.

JAY

(sarcastically to Steve)

It's a bit early for Halloween, isn't it?

Phil glares at Jay - shakes his head from side to side.  Steve and Phil give each other a look - awkward silence.

JAY (TO STEVE) (CONT'D)

You sure have a great tan.  I wish I had a tan like that.

STEVE (TO JAY)

Fake and bake is all it is.

(TO PHIL)

I only dropped by to say hello.  And I'm so glad I did.  I'll be off now.  Do be a dear and phone me a cab, Phil and be sure to tell them I'm going to smoke in it.

Steve leaves.

Jay and Phil clean up the apartment.

JAY

Why did you decide to help me like this?

Phil looks wistfully at the blue door.

PHIL

It seemed like the right thing do at the time.

JAY

Did you mean what you said earlier?

PHIL

I just said that to get Steve off your case.

Jay looks down in embarrassment.

JAY

Did you mean you would sort of help me out?  Like a dad would?

PHIL (IGNORNG THE QUESTION)

There are only three things a person needs to get along in this life: something to do, something to look forward to, and someone to love.

JAY

I'd kind of like someone to love me.

PHIL

Then you'll have to find someone that you can love first.  You don't get love until you give it.  Now I'm going to bed.

Phil walks toward his bedroom - Jay lies down on the sofa. 

CUT TO:

INT. PHIL'S KITCHEN -- MORNING

Phil is cooking breakfast - Jay enters the kitchen.

JAY

Good morning . . . uncle.

Phil glares.

Jay disappears into the bathroom - returns shortly. 

PHIL

How about calling me Phil?

JAY (SMILING)

OK.  And you can call me Jay.

Without comment, Phil puts a stack of pancakes and sausages in front of Jay.

JAY (CONT'D)

Oh goodie.  I get to use a knife and fork today? ... No chopsticks?

Phil ignores the comment.

Jay lapses into silence - gives his full attention to eating.

PHIL

If you don't have anything better to do, maybe you could take this back to Steve.

Phil holds out an elaborately stylish silver watch.

JAY

Wow.  What an amazing watch.  I'll take it to him if I can wear it.

Jay slips it onto his wrist.

PHIL

Sure.  Just don't lose it.  He's a Cancer and they're uptight about their possessions.

JAY

I'm a Virgo myself.

PHIL

You'd have to be a Virgo from the way you talk.

JAY

I've always read every book I could get my hands on.  It's important to use words correctly because people are judged by what they say.

PHIL

You sound a bit defensive about that.

JAY

I used to get teased all the time for wanting to read.

PHIL

That must have hurt.

JAY

Not as much as the feelings of not being understood.

(beat)

Where do I find Steve?

PHIL

He works at a travel agency in the mall.  I'll draw you a map.

INT. MALL -- AFTERNOON

Typical city mall- sidewalk sales - tables of merchandise in the mall.

Jay wanders aimlessly between tables - picks up a snake-skin wallet - admires it - slips it into his pocket.

Jay finds the travel agency - enters.

CUT TO:

INT. TRAVEL AGENCY -- CONTINUOUS

Steve is behind the counter - conservatively dressed - with ear studs.

                     STEVE (formally)               

Hello Jay.  How are you?

 

           JAY (dumbfounded)

Steve. Is that you?

                     STEVE (laughing)

I guess.

JAY

Phil asked me to give this to you.

Jay hands Steve the watch.

STEVE

Thanks.  I was hoping that's where I'd left it.  Sorry, but I've gotta keep working.  See you around.

Steve moves over to talk to a customer.

Jay leaves.

CUT TO:

INT. MALL -- CONTINUOUS

Jay wanders aimlessly - looking at tables of merchandise - sits on a bench - closes his eyes - dozes.

Steve walks up behind Jay.

STEVE

Hi Jay.  You want a ride home?

Jay jumps.

JAY (STARTLED)

You scared me.

STEVE

Sorry.  I didn't mean to.

CUT TO:

INT. CAR -- EVENING

JAY

This is such an amazing car.

Steve smiles in appreciation.

STEVE

It's the top of the line.  Blackout gauges, side airbags, four hundred horsepower, twenty-four valves and it goes from zero to a hundred clicks in less than six seconds.

JAY

Do you really know what all those words mean?

STEVE

Not a clue.  But I paid for them, so I'm going to use them.

They drive down the road and over a bridge.

JAY

Hey.  There's no river on the way to Phil's.

STEVE

Hope you don't mind.  I need to stop at my place and get out of these horrible work clothes.

JAY

Would it make any difference if I did mind?

STEVE (LAUGHING)

Not a bit.

Steve parks in front of a high-rise apartment.

INT. STEVE'S APARTMENT

Steve slips out of his shoes at the door - looks pointedly at Jay's feet.

JAY

You've got to be kidding.

Jay reluctantly takes off his shoes.

Plush white carpet - expensive avant guarde furnishings - large black and white posters and photographs of male nudes.

A wet bar in the living room - compact washer-dryer unit beside the bathroom door.

JAY (CONT'D)

Holy cow.  The travel agent business must pay well.  Or do you have some sort of illegal operations on the side?

Steve glares.

JAY (CONTRITELY) (CONT'D)

Just kidding.  Sorry.

STEVE

My job pays the rent and buys the groceries but that's about all.  The good stuff comes from my old man's money.

JAY

Gee.  I wish I had a father like that.

STEVE

You might not if you knew him.

JAY

Well at least you have a father.  That's more than I ever had.  And he must love you a lot to give you that kind of cash.

STEVE

Let me tell you about him.  He's got a successful business in Toronto, and he's been lucky on the stock market, so he's got way more money than he knows what to do with.

(beat)

He sends me a monthly cheque on the condition that I never go home to visit unless I'm invited.

(BEAT)

I'm still waiting to be invited.

Steve - points out over the balcony.

JAY

Great view.

STEVE

I'll go get us a drink.  What do you like?

JAY

Whatever you are having would be great.

Jay notices some crumbled bills on the patio table - picks up a couple - slips them into his pocket.

Steve appears with two drinks.

STEVE

Here, try this.  It's Long Island Iced Tea.

Jay tastes his drink and then finishes it quickly.

JAY

I like tea.

STEVE

It's pretty strong.

JAY

Tastes good to me.  Oh.  You mean its alcoholic?  I don't drink alcohol.

(beat)

But it's really tasty.

Steve points into a side room - bed - dresser - bookcase -computer system.

STEVE

This is the spare bedroom.  I don't use it now.

JAY

Have you read all those books?

STEVE

Good heavens, no.  I don't have any time for reading.  Unless I need something to put me to sleep.

JAY

I love reading.  I wish Phil had some books.

STEVE

Make yourself at home while I get us another drink.

Jay looks at some books - sits at the computer.

Steve returns with drinks.

JAY

I said I don't drink alcohol.

STEVE

Then don't drink it.

Jay takes tentative sip.

JAY

It is tasty.

STEVE

You'd probably enjoy the Internet.

JAY

I've never seen a computer before.  Do you use it much?

STEVE

I like chat rooms and downloading music.

On the side wall hang three formal old, formal portraits.

JAY

Are these your grandparents?

STEVE (laughing)

Yeah.  Right.  I bought them at an antique shop in Montana.  It was an easy way for me to create a family for myself.

Jay follows Steve into his bedroom - king-size waterbed, huge sound-center, walk-in closet.

STEVE (CONT'D)

Give me a minute while I change.

Steve slips off his shirt revealing a pierced nipple.

Jay takes a big gulp of his drink.

JAY

That must hurt.

STEVE

Not really.  It's more like when you were a kid and had a loose tooth.  You couldn't keep from wiggling it, could you?  Because you loved the delicious sensation of pain.

JAY

Yeah, but you're not a kid, and that's certainly no tooth.

Steve moves his chest toward Jay.  Hypnotized, Jay's fingers reach out and touch the ring.  He flips it up and down.

STEVE

Cool, eh?

JAY (TO HIMSELF)

I can't believe I'm doing this.

Steve goes out.

Jay sits on the bed - head in hands.

Steve returns with another more drinks.

STEVE

Here you go.

Jay jumps up.

JAY (STARTLED)

Quit doing that.

STEVE

Sorry.  I didn't mean to startle you.

JAY

That's OK.  Life in the city is so much more

(beat)

Startling.

Steve slips off his pants - pink bikini shorts - pulls on a pair of jeans and a T-shirt with the message: 2QT2BSTR8

STEVE

Cute message, eh?

JAY

(distracted)

Yeah.  Great.

Jay drains his glass.

STEVE

Would you be insulted if I gave you some clothes?  Those are the same one's you wore yesterday, and I bet they're the only ones you have.

JAY

Yes, sure.  Whatever you say is fine with me. 

(beat)

But only if you can spare them.

STEVE (POINTING TO THE CLOSET)

Doesn't it look like I could spare a few?  I've got a lot of things that are too tight since I started working out.

Steve flexes to show off his arms and chest.

JAY (stammering)

Ah.  Thanks.

STEVE

I should warn you about Phil.  He's had some rough times.

JAY

Is this a problem for me?

STEVE

Having you there might set him off again.  If things ever start looking like trouble, get out of there in a hurry.

JAY

I've got nowhere else to go.

STEVE

You can come here anytime.  The spare room is yours anytime if need it.  Really.

JAY

That's so kind of you.  I don't know why everyone is being so good to me.

Steve takes a key off the dresser - hands it to Jay.

CUT TO:

INT. PHIL'S APARTMENT -- MORNING

PHIL

Did you get the watch back to Steve?

JAY

Oh sure, no problem.  He gave me a bunch of nifty clothes.  You want to see them?

Jay pulls things out of the gym bag - holds them up - a T-shirt has the message, 2QT2BSTR8.

PHIL (laughing)

He gave you that?

JAY

Yeah.  He has one exactly like it.  Why, is there something wrong with it?

PHIL (AMUSED

Oh no.  Nothing at all.

Phil looks around the room.

PHIL (CONT'D)

It's kind of inconvenient sleeping on that bed, I guess.

JAY

For me or for you?

PHIL

For both of us.

JAY (worried)

You are saying you want me out of here?

PHIL

No.  I only meant what I said.  It's a bit inconvenient for both of us to have you sleeping in the middle of the living room.

JAY

(defensively)

If you want me to leave then say so.

Jay gets up and goes to the kitchen.

JAY (CONT'D)

(O.S.)

I can look after myself, you know.

PHIL

Don't be so touchy.  Having you here  brings back memories.  Maybe I should have got a dog instead of you.

JAY

I used to have a dog.  He was my best buddy for as far back as I can remember.

PHIL

A boy should have a dog.

JAY

Yeah, but he got old.  Mom decided that he couldn't stay outside through the cold of winter.  But he wasn't reliable enough about bathroom kind of things to stay indoors.

(beat)

I offered to clean up after him if he stayed inside, but she said he'd be too much trouble.

PHIL

I'm sorry.

JAY

She said that since I was the man-of-the-house, it was my job.  Besides, I was the only one who knew how to use a gun properly.

PHIL

You were doing him a kindness.  Putting him out of his misery.

JAY

I tried to make it easy for him at the end.  He was lying in the back yard with his head on his paws looking up at me with those big trusting eyes.  The bullet between his eyes was fast and painless.  I cradled him in my arms and took him to a place beside the lake where he used to love chasing the birds.  I buried him there at the top of a little hill so he could see everything.

PHIL

He knew you were his friend.  He'd understand you were doing what had to be done.

Jay walks toward the door.

JAY

I have things to do and places to go.  I'll see you later.

DISSOLVE TO:

INT. MALL -- AFTERNOON

JIMMY (pallid-faced 19-year-old, dirty-blond ponytail, skinny street kid look) sits at a table in the food court.

Jay, wearing a leather jacket over the 2QT2BSTR8 T-shirt, sits across from him.

JAY

How's it going Jimmy?

JIMMY

OK, I guess.  That jacket is way cool.

JAY (TAKING OFF THE JACKET)

Here.  Try it on.

JIMMY (PUTTING ON THE JACKET)

Sweet man.  How's the job working out?

JAY

Great.  How come you got me that job instead of working for Tony yourself?

JIMMY

I'm on parole.  Tony wouldn't hire me because I'm a bad risk.  It's like, nobody wants to hire an ex-con.

TIFFANY (groomed and polished, like a fashion model, early 20's) joins them.

JIMMY (CONT'D)

Tiff.  Say hi to my buddy Jay.

JAY

Hi Tiff - Jimmy's told me all about you.

TIFFANY

Like what?

JAY

That you are his girlfriend.

TIFFANY

Oh sure.  In his own mind.  Jimmy spends more time with his imagination than with reality.

JIMMY

Hey, come on Tiff.  You know we're tight.

TIFFANY (LOOKING AT JAY'S SHIRT)

So, Jay.  You're saying you're gay.

JAY (HORRIFIED)

What?  I didn't say that.

TIFFANY

Your shirt does.

JAY

Oh no.  Is that what that means?  Jimmy, give me back my jacket.  Damn that Steve anyway.

Jay put on the jacket and zips it closed.

TIFFANY

It didn't think I'd ever get here.  I can't seem to get the hang of one-way streets.

JIMMY

I can never get the hang of Thursdays.

TIFFANY

You try to go around one block and end up having to go around four of them just to get back where you started.

JIMMY

Mondays are, like, a total wipeout because I'm usually hungover.  That makes Tuesday the first day of the week and cheap movie night.

TIFFANY

Jimmy.  What are you babbling about?

JIMMY

Fridays I can get totally into because they're nothing but a fill-in-time before the weekend.  And Wednesdays are the middle of the week.  They are cool because then it's all downhill to the weekend.

TIFFANY

Shut up, Jimmy.

JIMMY (lamely)

But Thursdays don't fit in anywhere.  I never know what to do about Thursdays.

TIFFANY

I think the drugs have fried your brain, Jimmy.

JIMMY

It's like, reality is for people who can't handle drugs.

Tiffany gives Jimmy a withering look - gets up - goes to buy a snack.

Jimmy leans over to Jay.

JIMMY (CONT'D)

(whispering)

You got any spare cash?  I'm short of food for the weekend.

JAY

Sure.  I owe you for setting me up with Tony.  What do you need?

JIMMY

Whatever you can spare.

Jay slips a couple of folded bills into Jimmy's hand under the table - stands up.

JAY

Sorry, but I have to go.  There's someone I have to see.

Jay walks across the room - sits opposite TONY (well-dressed, slightly overweight, middle-age gentleman, sitting with his back to the wall).  After a brief discussion Jay takes a small package from Tony - leaves the mall.

CUT TO:

INT. PHIL'S APARTMENT -- MORNING

PHIL

Morning, Jay.  You have plans for supper tonight?

JAY

You know I never make plans.  I take life as it comes.  Did you have something in mind?

Phil sets out a plate of crepes and tofu bacon.

PHIL

I've invited a couple of friends over to celebrate the July 1st holiday.

JAY

Would that include your fag friend Steve?  You know that guy gives me the creeps.  I don't want to be here if he's coming.

PHIL

Steve did ask about you.  I said you'd be here.  It'll give you a chance to thank him for those clothes he gave you.

JAY (angrily)

You have no business saying what I will do, or where I will be, or what I should do.  And I never asked him for his stupid clothes.  I don't owe him anything.

PHIL

Maybe not.  But it wouldn't hurt you to be nice to my friends.  And I do wish you'd stop calling him a fag.  I hate that term.

JAY

I feel uncomfortable around him.

PHIL

Oh come on now, Jay.  You've only seen him twice.  I'd consider it a favor to me if you'd be here.  And maybe try to be civil to Steve, if you can.

JAY

I'm not doing it.  I'm out of here.

Jay heads toward the door.

PHIL

Dinner's at 6:30 if you decide to come.

JAY (O.S.)

Don't hold your breath.

CUT TO:

INT. PHIL'S APARTMENT -- EVENING

Table set - dinner for four.

Phil and Jay are sitting talking.

Door bell RINGS.  Phil goes to the door - enter Steve.

STEVE

Phil, so nice to see you again.

He hugs Phil - holds him at arms length - examines him.

STEVE (CONT'D)

You're looking good.

Looking over Phil's shoulder.

STEVE (CONT'D)

And Jay, how are you?

Steve walks over to Jay.  Jay backs away - looks horrified - Steve hugs Jay - Jay's hands stiffly at his side - keeps his face and crotch as far as possible from Steve.

Steve holds Jay at arm's length.

STEVE (CONT'D)

Nice to see you again, Jay.  How's life treating you?

JAY

Fine.

Jay escapes to a chair.  Steve sits beside him.  Door bell RINGS.  Enter SUE (plain, brunette, 20 years old, her smile lights up the room).

PHIL

Hi Sue.  This is my friend Jay.

SUE

Hello, Jay.  What's a nice guy like you doing hanging out with these reprobates?

STEVE

And who might you be calling reprobates?  I doubt any of us here even know what that means.

JAY (EAGERLY)

I know.  It means a person with low morals, like a villain.

Phil and Steve look impressed.

JAY (WITH MOCK INDIGNATION) (CONT'D)

And I don't think that is a nice word to use for my friends.  At worst they might be scoundrels.

SUE (laughing)

Sorry, guys.  I didn't mean anything by it.  It's my new word for today.  I thought it would be kind of nifty that nobody would know what it means.

(BEAT)

I guess I'll have to watch myself around Jay.

STEVE

Wherever did you learn words like that, Jay?

JAY

We had a pile of old Reader's Digests at home.  I memorized the Word Powers for something to do.  Those and the first volume of the World Book were my main reading materials.

(beat)

Along with the Bible.

The group sit down to dinner.

CUT TO:

GROUP EATING DINNER

Jay and Sue laughing and talking.

CUT TO:

Steve and Sue are leaving.

Jay has his arm around Phil's shoulder.

JAY (CONT'D)

Phil and I are buddies.  Like the two musketeers.  We look after each other, right Phil?

Phil disengaged himself from Jay's arm - guests leave.

Jay folds open the sofa and removes his shirt.

PHIL

That's a nasty bruise on your arm.

JAY

It's nothing.  It was an accident.

PHIL

I've seen some bruises in my day.  A big fist did that.  Or a stout piece of two-by-four.

JAY

It was an accident.  Ray was just fooling around.  He didn't mean to hit me.

Phil looks closer - turns him around.

PHIL

What about those welts on your back?

JAY

Leave me alone.

PHIL

Who's this Ray guy who did this to you?

JAY

Please don't be mad, Phil.  I deserved it.

PHIL

Nobody deserves to be beaten.

JAY

I shouldn't have made him angry.

PHIL

There's no excuse for what he did.

JAY

I argued with him when he was drunk.  My mom told me never to do that, but I wouldn't listen.

PHIL

This wasn't just once.  You've got scars here, too.

JAY (CRYING)

I'm stupid.  I never learn.  Please don't be mad at me.  I'll try to be good.

PHIL

You have to realize, Jay, that it wasn't your fault.

JAY

Of course it was.  He didn't want to hurt me.  If I hadn't acted stupidly this would never have happened.

PHIL

It wasn't your fault.

CUT TO:

INT. PHIL'S APARTMENT -- NIGHT

Jay is asleep on the sofa.

Phil sits in his chair - lit by the light from the window.

JAY (SOFTLY)

What are you looking at?

Phil does not respond.

Jay rolls off the sofa - waves his hand in front of Phi's eyes.

JAY (CONT'D)

Hello?

PHIL

Yeah, I'm here.  I was thinking.

JAY (ACCUSINGLY)

Have you been sitting there looking at me?

PHIL

I guess so, yeah.

JAY (ANGRILY)

So what is the big idea?  Why doesn't anybody around here leave me alone?  Is that so difficult?  I don't ask much, just that people stay out of my life.

PHIL

Sorry.  I was thinking about my nephew, not about you.

JAY

What's that smell?  Have you been smoking pot?

Phil goes to the blue door - unlocks it - opens it.

Jay follows.

PHIL

Maybe this will help you to understand.

Phil flips the light switch - sports paraphernalia and posters - waterbed.

Against one wall blue light bathes a table that acts as a shrine - photographs - wallet - school ring - smoking incense burner and a page torn from a lined note book.

On the bed is an AIDS quilt with the name Scotty and sport scenes.

JAY

Somebody lives here?

PHIL

No.  Not anymore.

Jay points to the page.

JAY

What's this?

Camera zooms in on the hand-written poem.

PHIL

It's a poem Scotty wrote for me.

Phil quotes the poem by memory.

DEATH BY DIVISION

Like a cuckoo's egg in a robin's nest,

The invader hid as one among millions,

Stealing shelter and nourishment, unnoticed.

Biding its time Waiting to strike.

A receptive disciple and a swift conversion,

Now there were two, then four, then eight -

Increasing in galloping geometric progression.

A covert army collecting its power.

One by one but thousands at a time,

Each converted cell saps my remaining strength,

Until there is none left and my body dies.

But it is only my body Not my Soul.

After a few moments Jay and Phil back reverantly out of the room.  Phil closes the door and locks it.

PHIL (CONT'D)

I've never shown that to anyone before.

JAY

I don't understand.

PHIL

After my nephew, Scotty, died.  I used to talk to him as if he were still around.  Until people started saying I was going crazy because I was talking to myself.  But you understand, don't you?  I wasn't talking to myself.  I was talking to Scotty.

JAY

I know how that is.  I used to talk to my dog even after he was dead.  He was my only friend even though he never talked back.  I suppose that makes me crazier than you because at least you were talking to a person.

PHIL

I made that little shrine and kept his room as a place where we could be together to talk whenever I wanted.

They stand for a moment in silence.

DISSOLVE TO:

INT. MALL FOOD COURT -- AFTERNOON

Jay and Sue are sitting eating a snack.

JAY

Why do you get me into these things?

SUE

I've never been to a rave but I think it would be fun.  You know I don't go anywhere without you.  All my girlfriends go to them.  I'd like to see what they are all raving about.

(beat)

That's a pun.  Laugh here.

JAY (GRINS)

You know that I don't like parties.  They make me uncomfortable.  I never know what to say.

SUE

A rave isn't like any party you've ever been to.

INT. TIFFANY'S APARTMENT -- AFTERNOON

Jimmy, Tiffany, Sue and Jay are sitting and talking.

TIFFANY

I can't believe it's your anniversary already.

JAY

Anniversary of what?

SUE

It's one month since we started going steady.

(beat)

And they said it wouldn't last.

JAY

Tell me about this rave thing.

SUE

It's best place for Trance or House or Techno.

JAY

I don't know any of those words.  Are you speaking English?

JIMMY

I hope they have some great hip-hop.

JAY

And what sort of weird stuff would hip-hop be?

SUE

It's kind of an inner‑city  electronic rap.

JAY

That sounds harmless enough.

(beat)

I haven't any idea what you just said.

TIFFANY

You have to get dressed up in something unusual.

JAY

Like a costume party?

TIFFANY

Not exactly.  You don't dress up like someone or something else.  It's more like you go as your alter ego.

JAY

I barely have any ego of my own let alone an alter one.  Give me a hint, what would I wear?

TIFFANY

Oh, I don't know.  Change your hair color, or spike it, or wear makeup or glitter.  You know, something unusual.  Let it all hang out.

JAY

Hello.  This is me.  Jay.  I don't do hair color or glitter or makeup. 

(beat)

And I have nothing I want to hang out.  At least not in public.

SUE

You must know somebody that can help you out with an outlandish image.

JAY

Oh sure.  I guess I'll have to call on my good old buddy, Steve.  He always seems to have solutions for problems I didn't know I had.

TIFFANY

Come with me Sue.  Maybe I have some far out clothes you could wear.

Tiffany and Sue go to the bedroom.

JIMMY

Tiffany gave me some money so we could treat you guys tonight.

(beat)

But I accidentally spent it.

CUT TO:

INT. RAVE -- NIGHT

A typical rave scene - Jay and Sue standing amidst the crowd.

Jay wears a blue vinyl jumpsuit - face made up with colored geometric shapes..

SUE

Don't think, just do.  Let yourself go.

JAY

You mean it's like a sort of Zen experience thing.

SUE (laughing)

Sometimes you scare me, Jay.

CUT TO:

INT. RAVE -- LATER

Jay has unzipped his suit to below the navel to keep cool.

SUE

Good grief.  You're looking more like Steve all the time.  We'd better go home soon or you'll be stripped down to your shorts.

JAY

Good idea.

SUE

I hope you mean leaving and not stripping.

JAY

I'll see if I can find the others.

DISSOLVE TO:

INT. CAR -- LATER

TIFFANY

Let's stop for a cup of coffee.

JIMMY (MUMBLING FROM THE BACK SEAT)

Go ahead, I'll stay here

SUE

Is Jimmy all right?

TIFFANY

He's whacked on acid again.  I had hoped he'd stay clean tonight because I knew he was out of cash.  I thought he had run out of people stupid enough to give him money.

JAY (LOOKING FORELORN)

That would be me.  I thought I was being helpful.

TIFFANY

It's not your fault.

JAY

If I hadn't given Jimmy money, he wouldn't have been able to buy drugs.  That makes it my fault.  I'm sorry.

TIFFANY

You meant well.  Besides, Jimmy's the one that took the drugs.  He's the one who's responsible not you.

SUE

Shouldn't we get him to the hospital?

TIFFANY

They wouldn't be able to do much for him in this condition.  He just needs time for that junk to work its way out of his system.

SUE

I still think we should get him to a doctor.  This scares me.

TIFFANY

So long as he's conscious he's all right.  If he passes out then we'll get him to a doctor.

DISSOLVE TO:

INT. PHIL'S APARTMENT -- LATER

PHIL

Big night?

JAY

Yeah.  You didn't wait up for me, did you?

PHIL

In a way I did, but it's no big deal.  I have a surprise for you.  You remember before you left we were talking about it being inconvenient with you on the sofa?

JAY

You're going to ask me to leave, aren't you.  I knew it.

PHIL

Come here.  I'll show you.

Phil opens the blue door - Jay looks in.

The table with mementos of Scott is gone - pictures and posters have been removed from the walls.

PHIL (CONT'D)

This is your room now, Jay.

JAY

You mean I get to use the whole room?  Just for me?

Phil nods - Jay goes over and stands beside the bed - looks over at Phil.

JAY (CONT'D)

I don't know how to say this, but did Scott . . . ?

PHIL

Yes, he slept here.  Is that a problem?

JAY

I know that.  But did he . . . uh . . . you know.

PHIL

He didn't die here, if that's what's bothering you.  When he knew his time had run out he asked one last favor of me.

(beat)

A few of his closest friends and I took him to a hotel room.  He died peacefully there of a drug overdose.

JAY

What a horrible experience.

PHIL

He died as he had lived.  Surrounded by his friends, and without pain.  It was the least we could do for a good friend.

They sit for a moment of silent thought.

JAY

I've never known anybody who died.  I couldn't stay in the same room where someone died.  Not even in the same house.  Death scares me.

PHIL

Surely you realize that it is only the person's body that dies.  The soul doesn't die, and that's the real person.  The body is just a convenient place for the soul to spend this lifetime.

Jay goes over and lies down on the bed - it GURGLES as he rolls around on it. 

JAY

This is the nicest thing anyone has ever done for me.  I wish there were some way that I could repay you.

PHIL

Don't think about repaying me.  Make good karma by doing something nice for someone else.

CUT TO:

INT. PHIL'S APARTMENT -- MORNING

PHIL (TO JAY)

Any messages on the machine?

JAY

A wrong number.  Nothing to worry about.

Phil pushes the replay button.

ANSWERING MACHINE (O.S.)

(menacing male voice)

We know where you live.  We'll be   coming to get you.

JAY

I told you it was a wrong number.

PHIL

It sounds to me like it's Tony.

JAY

How could he find me so fast?

PHIL

Get real, Jay.  Those guys have to know who they are dealing with if they expect to stay out of jail.  He probably knows what color shorts you wear.

JAY (WALKING TWARD THE DOOR)

I have to get out of here before Tony sends his goons to get me.

PHIL

Jay.  Wait a minute.

JAY

I'll be back to pick up my stuff as soon as I find another place to stay.

Jay leaves.

CUT TO:

EXT. FRINGE FESTIVAL -- EVENING

Outdoor festival.  TANYA (long, straight black hair, black outfit like a witch), sits on the curb eating a hot dog.

Jay sits on the curb a little way from her.

JAY

Hello.  This is my first time here.  Any suggestions as to what one does for fun?

Tanya looks deeply into Jay's eyes.

JAY (CONT'D)

I could use some company.

Tanya continues to look into his eyes.

JAY (CONT'D)

Hello.  Anyone home in there?

TANYA

I am picking up mixed vibrations from you.  Your aura is disturbed.  Tell me about yourself.

Jay slides over closer to Tanya

JAY

My name is Alex.  I'm here with my parents, but they went off on their own.

TANYA

Your name can't be Alex, and you are not here with your parents.

JAY (FLUSTERED)

What do you mean?  You can't tell me what my name is or isn't.

TANYA

Alex is number 5 in the Kabala Numerical alphabet.  Number 5 people are charming, courteous and easy going.  That is not you.

(BEAT)

I sense a conflict between your earthly body and your inner soul that has nothing to do with your parents.  They are not here.

JAY

(to himself)

What can you expect when I have people dedicated to the forcible separation of my body from my soul?

TANYA

You are a person who seeks total freedom and have a hunger for knowledge.  This is typical of a 3-person.  Your cosmic name is Truro.

JAY

What's your name?

TANYA

You may call me Tanya.

JAY

There are a couple of guys looking to beat on me.  I have no place to go and no place to stay tonight.

TANYA

Come.  Let's go to one of the performances to take your mind off yourself.

CUT TO:

INT. BIG ROOM -- CONTINUOUS

Makeshift stage - folding chairs - amateur performance.

Jay slips his arm around Tanya's shoulder.  They kiss.

Jay pulls back.

JAY

Do you wear braces?

TANYA

No.

They kiss again.  Suddenly Jay pulls away.

JAY

What do you have in your mouth?

TANYA

Oh.  You mean my tongue ring.

Tanya sticks out her pierced tongue.

JAY (IN HORROR)

Good grief.  Why did you do that?

TANYA

I like to play with it in my mouth.  It's like a little soother that's always handy.

CUT TO:

EXT. FRINGE FESTIVAL -- CONTINUOUS

Jay and Tanya walk hand-in-hand between the kiosks - sit to watch jugglers on the outdoor stage. 

JAY

I'd like to see you again.  Could you give me your phone number or something?

TANYA

No.  If it's our destiny to meet again, we will.  If it's not, then we won't.  One does not control one's own fate, nor the fortunes of another.

JAY (SARCASTICALLY)

Yeah, right.  Are you saying that if someone is going to punch my lights out that I should just stand there and hope that my destiny will arrange for him to get hit by a truck before he hits me?  No thanks.  I like to be responsible for creating my own destiny.

TANYA

Put aside your negative thoughts and be at peace with the universe.  Only then can your true destiny be fulfilled.  Ciao, Truro. 

JAY

  May the force be with you, too, Tanya.  Bye.

CUT TO:

EXT. VACANT LOT -- NIGHT

Vagrants sit - pass a bottle in brown paper bag back and forth.

VAGRANT

Wanna snort?

Passes Jay the bottle.

JAY

Thanks.

They pass the bottle around.

JAY (CONT'D)

Where do you guys sleep?

VAGRANT (POINTING)

The Guiding Light Mission down there has a shelter.  But they don't allow booze, or smoking or anything.  At least here a guy can do what he wants.

CUT TO:

EXT. SMALL PARK -- EVENING

Jay walks around the park - lies on a bench - gets up - steps carefully through a flower bed - lies on grass under a tree and falls asleep.

CUT TO:

EXT. SMALL PARK -- MORNING

Jay gets up - brushes some of the dirt off his clothes - tries to smooth his hair - checks his pocket - wallet is gone - gets up - tiptoes back through the flower bed.

Jay walks out to a deserted street - sits against a brick wall - dozes.  

A middle-aged businessman pauses in front of him - their eyes lock - the man holds out a loonie (dollar coin).

Jay takes the coin - gets up and walks down the street.

CUT TO:

INT. RED DRAGON -- LATER

Red Dragon is a dingy restaurant in old building.

HAN SING (wizened old Asian) is working behind the counter,

Enter Jay.

JAY

You got coffee and toast for a dollar?  It's all the cash I've got.

HAN SING fills a cracked cup with coffee - puts a slice of bread into the toaster.

HAN SING

Let's see the money.

Jay sets his loonie on the counter - laces the coffee to overflowing with cream and sugar.

JAY

I need a job.  You know anyone who's hiring?

HAN SING

(squinting)

I could use a bus boy nights.  It gets busy sometimes.  You look scrawny.  Think you could handle it?

JAY

I'm tougher than I look.  How much does it pay?

HAN SING

A hundred and twenty bucks a week.

You can have your meals free if you don't eat too much.

JAY

Is there any way you could give me a place to stay? 

HAN SING

There's a room upstairs.  It's not much, but there aren't any cockroaches.  The other guy living up there is always quiet.  You can have it for twenty a week.

JAY

How about an advance on my salary?  I gave you my last dollar.

HAN SING (WITH CYNICAL SMILE)

Not in this lifetime, sonny boy.  You do the work before you see the money.

JAY

Can I see the room?

CUT TO:

INT. JAY'S ROOM -- MOMENTS LATER

The door opens into a tiny room - light bulb hangs from frayed wires - sway-backed bed - wooden chair - broken roll top desk.

JAY

Bathroom?

HAN SING

Downstairs in the restaurant.  There's a pay phone down there, too.

CUT TO:

INT. RED DRAGON -- MOMENTS LATER

JAY

What would I be expected to do?

HAN SING

Clean the tables, wash dishes, sweep up after we close.  Maybe help throw out a drunk now and then.

JAY

I can handle that.

HAN SING (laughing)

If you get to wait on customers you get to keep the tips.

JAY

What's the joke?

HAN SING

Nobody ever leaves a tip in a place like this.

JAY

How soon can I start?

HAN SING

Right now.  Here's a pot of tea for the guy at the top of the stairs.  We call him R.B.

JAY

R.B.?

HAN SING

His name is Running Bear, but we prefer to call him R.B.

A grin tugs at Han Sing's mouth.

HAN SING (CHUKLING) (CONT'D)

It spares us the image of him running around without any clothes on.  That's not a sight anybody wants to think about.

(BEAT)

My name is Han Sing.  You can call me Han, or you can call me Sing or you can call me Han Sing.  Just don't call me late for dinner.

Han doubles over in laughter.

Jay makes a wry face.

JAY

You should be a comedian.

Jay takes the tea up the stairs - taps on the door - leans his head through the doorway - puts one foot in.  

A deep-throated GROWL from within the room.

JAY (CONT'D)

Good dog, nice dog, good dog.

R.B. (old Indian, long braids of grey hair, weathered, wrinkled face) sits cross-legged on the hide-covered floor - rugs create a circular space like a tepee floor.

A small wooden bowl on the floor near the door contains several crumpled bills and change.

An old German Shepherd dog lies at the man's feet with its head on his paws.

R.B.

Come.

Jay steps into the room - hands R.B. the tea pot.

JAY

Nice dog you have.

R.B.

Do not speak yet.  To speak now would be like the wind blowing through long grass on a summer's day.  Pleasant enough, but conveying no meaning.

R.B. gets two old cups - hands one to Jay - fills both.

Several minutes pass in silence as they drink tea.

R.B. (CONT'D)

Thank-you for the tea.

JAY

I was glad to do it.  Nice dog you have.

R.B.

Arrow is a good dog.  He was a seeing-eye dog in his younger days before he came to me.  Now he thinks he's my guard dog. 

(beat)

What is your Ojibway name?

JAY

How did you know I am half-native?

R.B.

I am shaman.

JAY

Maytwayashing is my mother's name.

R.B.

That means a gentle wind blowing through the trees in a deep valley.

JAY

I do not know my father's name.  I like how you have your room set up.

R.B.

I keep our traditional ways.  I teach the wisdom and culture of our elders to any who will listen.  I am shaman to those who are troubled.

JAY

Great.  Then you can fix things for me?

R.B.

You must heal yourself.  You can ask the spirits for guidance and help.  They may come to you or they may not.

JAY

Would you help me to contact them?

R.B.

It is my duty as a shaman to help all who ask.  But we must wait until the time is right.  You will know when.

R.B. shuffles toward the door.

R.B. (CONT'D)

My dog needs to go out for his evening walk.  My knees are tired.

JAY

You'd like me to take him?

R.B.

It would be a favor to me,

(beat)

And to him.

JAY

Anything special I should know about Arrow?

R.B.

He likes the fire hydrant or the telephone pole.  Guide him to one.

JAY

That's easy enough.

R.B.

His joints are stiff.  Sometimes he can't balance to lift his leg.  You may have to help him.

Jay leads Arrow to the door.  He sneaks a few bills from the  bowl of money when R.B. is looking away.

CUT TO:

EXT. THE STREET -- LATER

Jay and Arrow walk slowly - Jay guides him to a tree - Arrow circles the tree several times.

JAY (TO ARROW)

Oh all right then.

Jay lifts Arrows back leg and holds it up.

JIMMY (O.S.)

Yo.  Is that you, Jay?  Whatcha doing with that dog.

Jay jumps - drops Arrow's leg.

JAY

Jimmy.  What are you doing in this neighborhood?

JIMMY

I might ask you the same thing.I Thought you lived on the other side of town.

JAY

I'm working over there now.

Jay points to the Red Dragon.

JIMMY

As a dog sitter?

JAY

Don't get smart.  As waiter and bouncer.  Drop in anytime and I'll buy you a coffee.

JIMMY

See you later.  Right now I've gotta go and take care of some other stuff.  Have fun with your dog.

Jimmy takes few steps - turns back.

JIMMY (CONT'D)

Do you happen to have a few bucks you could throw my way?  I need to buy some potatoes for the weekend and maybe . . .

JAY (INTERRUPTING)

Don't bother explaining.  I've got spare cash so it's yours.  What you do with it is your business.

Jay hands a couple of bills to Jimmy.

JAY (CONT'D)

Just please don't use it for drugs.  I couldn't handle the guilt if you killed yourself with my money.

JIMMY

That's nice of you to say.

JAY

I do mean it, Jimmy.  Look after yourself.  What you do with your life influences my life.

JIMMY

Thanks.  I'll pay you back when I can.

Jimmy walks down the street - Jay walks with Arrow back to Red Dragon.

DISSOLVE TO:

INT. STEVE'S APARTMENT -- LATER

KNOCK on the door.

STEVE

Yes.

JAY (O.S.)

Hi Steve.  It's Jay.

Steve opens the door - he wrinkles his nose in mock disgust.

STEVE

Good lord, what has happened to you.  You look awful.  Get in here before anyone sees you.  I have my reputation to consider.

Jay takes a step.

Steve puts up his arms to stop Jay.

STEVE (CONT'D)

Wait.  You'll track dirt onto my carpet.  Take your shoes off.

Jay removes his shoes.

STEVE (CONT'D)

Oh no.  Your socks are just as filthy.  Hang on.

Steve hooks Jay under the arms and the back of his knees - carries him into the living room.

JAY (STRUGGLING)

What do you think you are doing?  Put me down!

Steve looks around for a place to deposit Jay - chooses the bathroom.

STEVE

Get out of those clothes and into the shower.  Ursh!  You're a mess.  Don't go anywhere.  Don't touch anything.  Don't even breathe until you get cleaned up.

JAY (PLAINTIVELY)

Aren't you glad to see me?

STEVE (SCREWING UP HIS FACE)

Maybe I should phone for an exterminator.  You don't have bugs, do you?

Steve takes a plastic garbage bag from on top the dryer - passes it to Jay through the bathroom.

STEVE (CONT'D)

Here, put your clothes in this, and give them to me so I can burn them.

JAY

All of them?

STEVE

Yes.  And your underwear, too.  Use the shampoo and soap on the shelf in the tub.

(BEAT)

And use the green bath towel.  But please, please.  Please don't touch anything else until after you've showered.

Steve mixes a drink - hands it through the door to Jay - takes the clothes to the dryer.

CUT TO:

INT. STEVE'S APARTMENT -- LATER

Steve settles down on the sofa - puts on headphones.

JAY (CALLING O.S.)

Steve.

Jay peeks out the door.

JAY (LOUDER) (CONT'D)

Steve, I need clothes.

No response.

Jay comes out with a towel around his waist.

JAY (to himself) (CONT'D)

Oh boy, here we go again.  Except this time I am the naked one.  Why is it that we can never both stay dressed?

Jay stands in front of Steve.  Steve takes off headphones - looks up - grins - gazes up and down Jay's body.

JAY (SCOWLING) (CONT'D)

Do you mind?  I need something for me to wear?  

STEVE

Sure, hang on a sec.

Steve leaves - returns with an ornate black silk dressing gown.

STEVE (CONT'D)

This should do for the moment.  Sit down and tell me what's been happening with Phil.

Jay leaves - returns wearing the dressing gown.

STEVE (CONT'D)

I talked to Phil last night.  He said you had left.

(beat)

And you obviously hadn't washed since you left.

JAY

Did he say why?

STEVE

No.  He said that you had packed up and left.  Did you guys have a fight?

JAY

Of course not.  I needed to get away.  I'm working at the Red Dragon now.

Jay keeps struggling to keep the dressing gown closed - it keeps sliding open.

STEVE

Isn't that the dive somewhere up North Main?

JAY

Yes.  I'm now officially from the wrong side of the tracks.  It's a job and I have a room there.  The people there are nice to me.

STEVE

Getting back to Phil, he was in a fight with someone.  He has a black eye and a bunch of bruises on his face.  Do you know anything about that?

Jay tucks the dressing gown firmly down between his legs - crosses his bare feet on the coffee table.

STEVE (CONT'D)

Sorry about that dressing gown.  Silk is bad that way.  Don't worry about it.  I won't look.

Steve flashes an evil smile at Jay.

Jay glares.

Steve leans forward to look at Jay's bare feet.

STEVE (CONT'D)

What are those circles on your feet?  They look like cigarette burns.

Jay puts his feet under the table.

JAY

It's nothing.

STEVE

Sorry.  I didn't mean to pry.

JAY

Look, Steve.  I do appreciate what you've done for me.  And heaven knows I did need that shower.  But how about you just stay out of my life.

STEVE

I do care about you, whether you like it or not.  I can't help that.

JAY

I don't want you to care about me.  I came here to on my own but you and Phil keep messing things up on me.

Steve gets Jay's clothes out of the dryer - hands them to Jay - mixes two drinks at the liquor cabinet.

STEVE

Hang on there.  I know you're upset about something but you aren't making much sense.

Hands a drink to Jay. 

STEVE (CONT'D)

I'm only doing for you what I would do for any of my friends.  Or even for a stranger

(beat)

If he's cute.  You're the one with the problem, not me.

JAY

Maybe you're right.

(beat)

And I must say that I hate it when you are right, because that would mean that I'm wrong.  I'm upset and I apologize for taking it out on you.

(BEAT)

And I hate apologizing, too. 

(beat)

But there's something I've got to do.

Jay finishes his drink - takes his clothes - changes in the bathroom.

JAY (O.S.)

I'll come back when I've done what needs to be done.  Unless I end up in the hospital.  Is that okay with you?

STEVE

It certainly isn't okay with me if you go to the hospital.  But of course you're welcome to come back here anytime you want.

Jay walks to the door.

STEVE (CONT'D)

Hair.

JAY

Excuse me.

STEVE

Your hair.  You can't go out looking like that.

JAY (DEFENSIVELY)

Well, you wouldn't let me use your hair brush.  What did you expect me to do?

STEVE

Maybe ask for one.  Come here.

Steve picks up a hair brush and starts brushing Jay's hair.

Jay resists violently - then gives up.

STEVE (CONT'D)

You have nice hair, Jay.  With a bit of styling and maybe a reddish-blond tint you would look really hot.

JAY

Fly off with your ideas.  You're not getting your hands anywhere near my hair.  As a matter of fact, you are not getting your hands anywhere near my anything.

STEVE

Just a suggestion.  If you change your mind, just say the word.  My friends say I'm a good hairstylist.

Jay walks unsteadily to the door.

STEVE (CONT'D)

Can I give you a ride?

JAY

No thanks.  I think the walk would be good for me.

DISSOLVE TO:

INT. R.B.'S ROOM -- LATER

R.B. (TO JAY)

I see you have made a decision.

R.B. unwraps a hide bundle - opens a small leather pouch - hangs an amulet around his neck.

He spreads out four colored circles of cloth: scarlet, blue, white and yellow.

Jay selects the yellow one.

R.B. (CONT'D)

Yellow is the color of the Eagle Spirit.  The eagle flies high and sees far.  Its feather is sacred because it knows all that the eagle sees and it can give good counsel to those who will listen.

R.B. guides him to stand on the yellow circle - sprinkles tobacco in a circle on the cloth around him.

R.B. (CONT'D)

We must make an offering of tobacco. 

JAY

But I don't know how to listen to an eagle feather.

R.B.

You must make an offering to invite the spirits.  They will guide you. 

R.B. puts some brown material in a small dish - lights it with a propane fireplace lighter.

R.B. (CONT'D)

It's not traditional but it saves my old fingers.

JAY

Is that sweetgrass?

R.B.

It is the fungus which grows on the diamond willow.  Its smoke invites the spirits to come.

R.B. waves the smoke around the door and the room in clockwise circles - chanting softly in Ojibway - shows Jay how to scoop the smoke - pour it over his head - inhale and exhale the smoke.

Arrow hobbles to the farthest corner of the room.

R.B. (CONT'D)

When you breath in, the smoke mixes with your thoughts and prayers.  When you breath out, the smoke goes up to the spirits and carries your prayers with it.  Thus your guiding spirit will know what you need.

The ceremony continues in silence for some time.

JAY

But how will I know what I should do? 

R.B.

If the spirit comes, you will be given a vision or a dream to guide you.  Now go and rest.  

INT. JAY'S ROOM -- LATER

Jay is sleeping fitfully.

FADE OUT TO SEPIA:

EXT. FOREST CLEARING WITH LAKE & ASPENS -- AFTERNOON

Jay is hunting with his rifle - he is approached by three deer - aims from one another - deer come closer.

Jay turns to run - stumbles - can't get up - deer surround him - one rears up ready to pummel him with its hooves.

An eagle circles motionlessly above him.

The deer head morphs into the face of Tony - then into the head of a wolf.

The deer's body morphs into the body of a wolf.  The wolf turns and chases the other two deer away.

A lone eagle feather floats to the ground beside Jay. 

FADE BACK TO COLOR:

Jay sits up.  The hanging light bulb morphs into an eagle and circles the room.  He runs to R.B.'s room.

CUT TO:

INT. R.B.'S ROOM -- CONTINUOUS

JAY

I had a dream, but I don't understand it.  I was about to be trampled by a herd of deer and I could not escape.  There was an eagle somewhere, but it didn't help me at all.

R.B.

Your vision was good.  It shows you where your present path will lead you.

JAY

So this is what will happen to me?  I'll be trampled by a herd of deer that look like Tony.  How does knowing that help me?

R.B.

You must take some action to avoid harm.

JAY

But what should I do? 

R.B.

The spirit of the Eagle is there to protect you if you chose to make a plan and to act upon it.

JAY

I don't know how to change things.

R.B.

What you do with knowledge is up to you.  Only you can find the path that is best for you.  Have faith in the Eagle Spirit.  It will protect you when you act.

DISSOLVE TO:

INT. MALL -- AFTERNOON

Tony sits alone - holding a cigarillo between thumb and first two fingers. 

Jay walks over and sits across from Tony

TONY (SURPRSED)

Yes.  Please.  Sit.  We have been unable to find you lately.  But I hoped that maybe you would come to find me.  I like that you have come to me.  Let me get us something to eat.  The pizza here is quite acceptable.

Tony lifts his hand and snaps his fingers.

Jay looks confused.

TONY (CONT'D)

Tell me how things are with you.  You have been in my thoughts lately.  I worried that perhaps something unfortunate had happened to you.  You have not even been seeing your girlfriend lately.

JAY

You mean that you've had Sue's place under surveillance?  How did you know about her anyway?

TONY

I was concerned for you.  I take a personal interest in all my associates.

JAY

I had to go away for a while.

A heavy set GANGSTER-type brings pizza and drinks to the table.

GANGSTER

Here you are boss.  I hope the Pepsi is satisfactory.

Gangster walks to the far side of the food court.

TONY

I know you usually like pepperoni pizza and Pepsi.

JAY

How could you possibly know that?

TONY

I have people who tell me things that might be useful to me.  Knowledge is power. 

(beat)

You did not show me much respect when you told me your name was Joe.  I am not so easily fooled.

JAY

Joe is my middle name.

TONY (WAVING HIS HAND)

It is of no importance.  Enjoy the pizza.

JAY

If you had a beef with me, then you should have dealt with me.  You had no right going around beating up on my friends.

TONY

I see my little bantam rooster has some fight in him after all.  I like that.

JAY (ANNOYED)

Where do you get off having your goons beat up on Phil?

TONY

And he has loyalty to his friends.  Another good quality in a man.

JAY (angrily)

This isn't about me.  I'm here to talk about you.  Where do you think you get off beating up on innocent people?

TONY

But a bit impatient.  This is not a quality I admire.  But I overlook it for now.

Jay stands up - starts to walk away.

TONY (CONT'D)

I will explain.

Jay sits down.

TONY (CONT'D)

We waited for a period of time for you to contact me.  You didn't.  I send my boys to your friend's place to find you.  They meant you no harm.  I wished only to understand your motivations concerning our business dealings.

JAY

So why did they beat up on my friend?

TONY

When they ask about you, your friend Phil, he goes wild, slams one of my boys against the wall and starts throwing his fists about.  They only try to persuade him to calm his anger.  It is unfortunate, but sometimes a person may get hurt under such circumstances.

(beat)

But enough about him.  Am I to understand that you no longer wish to work with me? 

JAY

That's right.  It was wrong to quit without telling you.  But I should never have become involved in this kind of activity in the first place.

TONY

Did we not have an agreement that should be honored?

JAY

We didn't sign anything.  There was no legal contract.

TONY

We agreed to certain things.  You would do me some favors and I would repay you for your kindness.  Contracts are not necessary between people who trust each other.

Tony leans close to Jay.

TONY (CONT'D)

I like you.  You would do well working for me.  But I will respect your wishes.  I trust you will respect mine.

JAY

And your wishes would be . . .

TONY

That you not discuss my business with others.  There are those who do not wish me success in my efforts to make an honest living.  It would make me unhappy if I discovered you to be one of those people.

JAY

You live your life and I will live mine.

TONY

It pleases me to hear you say that.  I will tell my associates that you do not wish to be further involved with us.  They will listen to me.  

Tony draws deeply on his cigarillo - blows a cloud of smoke upwards.

TONY (CONT'D)

And your friend, Phil.  I could have use for a man like him.  You may tell him what I have said.  The impression he left on my boys will not soon be forgotten.

CUT TO:

INT. SUE'S HOME -- EVENING

A doorbell RINGS.

HELEN (middle-aged, portly lady) opens the door.

Jay is standing at the door.

JAY

Hello.  You must be Sue's mom.

HELEN

And you must be Jay.  It's so good to meet you at last.  George, come down here and meet Sue's new boyfriend.

GEORGE (double-breasted, middle-aged businessman, grey pinstripe suit, trimmed grayish moustache).  Looks up from his newspaper.

GEORGE

Nice to meet you, young man.  We have heard so little about you.  Sit down and tell me.

JAY

Tell you what?

GEORGE

Tell me all about yourself, of course.  Where do you come from?  Who are your parents?  What do they do for a living?  Sue is my daughter, and these are things I need to know if you're going to be dating her.

HELEN

Oh for heaven's sake, George, give the lad a chance to get comfortable before you start interrogating him.  Where are you and Sue planning to go tonight, Jay?

JAY

We were thinking . . .

GEORGE

(interrupting)

I'm not going to interrogate him.  But I do feel that we have a responsibility to know something about the person who is dating our daughter.  After all, you remember what happened with her last boyfriend, don't you?

HELEN

Let's not bring that up again.  It wasn't our fault that he turned out to be married.  You're not married are you, Jay?

JAY

Heavens no.

HELEN

Maybe you'd like a drink, Jay?

JAY (ENTHUSIASTICALLY)

Yes, please, I'd love one.

HELEN

What would you like?

Jay thinks for a moment.

JAY

A glass of water would be nice.

HELEN

Would you look after that, please dear?  I have to finish dressing.

Helen goes up the spiral staircase.

George gets a bottle of Perrier, glasses and three fingers of Scotch.

JAY

(talking too fast)

Thank-you, sir.  I like your house.  It has a great ambiance.  I mean it's nice.  Did you buy it new?

GEORGE (formally)

We designed and built it ourselves.

JAY

You build houses?

GEORGE (INDIGNANTLY)

Well, I certainly didn't build it with my own hands, if that's what you mean.  I hire people to do that sort of thing.  I don't suppose that your parents are the sort of people who have to work with their hands to make money, are they?

JAY

Oh no.  Neither of my parents has ever worked a day in their lives as far as I know.

GEORGE

That's good.  Our family has been in the investment business for three generations.  We let our money do our work for us.  And what about you?  What do you do besides dating my daughter?

JAY

Right now I'm getting experience in the restaurant industry.  I plan to open a chain of restaurants in a few years.

GEORGE

When you have enough collateral, send me a copy of your business plan. 

JAY

Thanks.  In what sort of things do you usually invest?

GEORGE

Mostly real estate.  Our family members are all shareholders in a single company that deals with all our financial matters.

JAY

So the money isn't yours then?

GEORGE

Of course it's ours.  It's managed by us through the company for us.  We get tax benefits that way.

JAY

Sort of like democracy.

GEORGE

Excuse me?

JAY (SMILING)

Management of the money for the money and by the money.

GEORGE

That's cute.  I see why Sue likes you.  Do you golf?

JAY

Of course.  It's a great game.

GEORGE

What's your handicap?

JAY (to himself)

Just my big mouth.

GEORGE

Excuse me?

Helen enters - evening dress - diamond pendant.

HELEN (INTERRUPTING)

It was nice meeting you, Jay.  Sue will be down in a minute.  Make yourself at home.  Come on George.  We don't want to be late.

George glances at his gold-plated Rolex watch - pours another drink - Jay stares at the watch.

GEORGE

Sit sown and be sociable to our new young friend.  You like my watch, Jay?

JAY

Sorry.  I didn't mean to stare.  It's awesome.

GEORGE

Notice how smoothly the second hand moves?  That's how you can tell it's a genuine Rolex.  With cheap imitations the hand jumps from second to second. 

(beat)

I always say: if you can afford a nice watch, you deserve to have the time flow by without having any jerks interfering with it.

HELEN

George likes his life to run smoothly.

JAY

Something like that must have cost a thousand dollars.

GEORGE

A thousand would about cover the tax on it.

George and Helen move to the door.

HELEN

Now let's go or we'll be late for the appetizers.

GEORGE (TO JAY)

We should get together for a round of golf sometime.

JAY

Splendid idea.  I can be available anytime.  Thanks.

(to himself)

I wonder how long it takes to learn to play golf?  Maybe Phil can teach me this weekend.

George and Helen leave.

Jay wanders around the room looking at the knick-knacks - Almost puts one in  his pocket - puts it back.

Sue enters the room.  She and Jay hug.

SUE

Want to watch TV?

JAY

Sure.

They fall onto the sofa and start necking.

CUT TO:

INT. MALL FOOD COURT -- AFTERNOON

Jay and Jimmy sit eating pizza and Pepsi.

JIMMY

I've been wanting to talk to you.  I know I owe you, like, a pile of cash that I can't pay back.

JAY

That's OK.  I know you'll pay me when you can.

Jimmy hands Jay an old gold Rolex watch.

JIMMY

I'd like you to have this.

JAY

Wow!  That's totally awesome.  But where would a guy like you get a watch like that?

JIMMY

It doesn't matter where I got it.  You're the kind of guy who likes nice things.  You want it, it's yours.

Jay slides the watch onto his wrist - admires it.

JAY

It's exactly what I've needed to make an impression on Sue.

JIMMY

Glad you like it.  You've been such a good friend to me.  You've always accepted me just as I.

JAY

I'll think of you every time I look at it.

JIMMY

I'd like that.  There aren't many people that think about me.  Sometimes I wonder if my life is worth anything.

JAY

Maybe now that you're off drugs you'll see what people really think about you.  It's hard to feel close to a guy who's high all the time, you know.

JIMMY

I'm hanging in there.  Sometimes when I'm tempted I think of you and how you handle your life so well.  It helps me have some willpower.  It's not easy you know, when nobody cares about you, and you have no job.

JAY

Tiffany loves you.

JIMMY

She puts up with me.  She's always been too nice a person to throw me out on the street.  I think maybe she's liking me better now.

JAY

Then there's all the gang we hang out with.  You've got more friends than I do and I'm happy.

JIMMY

You have Phil and Steve.  Those guys look after you.  They care about you.

JAY

They're more trouble than you could imagine.  But maybe you're right.  They do give me a feeling that somebody cares.  It doesn't bother him that I'm metis.  That's a nice change.

JIMMY

Aren't you worried all the time about what he's like, thinking or what he might try to do?

JAY

Sometimes, but not so much anymore.  It's just in my head.

Tiffany sits down with them.

TIFFANY

Hi Jay.  What are you two plotting about so seriously?

JIMMY

Just boy stuff.

CUT TO:

INT. SUE'S HOME -- AFTERNOON

Sue and Jay are talking.

SUE

Do you still see Tanya?

JAY

Who?

SUE

Tanya.  Don't play dumb.  I know about her.

JAY

I haven't seen her since we started going steady.  It's been months since I've even thought about her.

SUE

So you admit you used to think about her.

JAY

Why do I feel that I'm not going to win in this discussion?  Maybe I should go home now.

SUE

If that's the way you feel about it, maybe you should.

Jay opens the door - a swirl of snow blows into the foyer.

Jay closes the door.

JAY

We shouldn't be fighting like this.  Tell me.  What's bothering you?  It isn't Tanya at all, is it?

Sue sits quietly for a few minutes.

SUE

No.  You're right.  It isn't Tanya.  It's about us.

JAY

Does that mean about me?

SUE

It's my dad.

JAY

I thought he liked me.  We even have a golf date for the summer.

SUE

He liked you better before he found out you live in a grubby little room above a rundown restaurant.  And you don't come from a wealthy family. 

JAY

And that I'm metis?

SUE

Heaven's no.  He doesn't even suspect that.  Dad liked you better when he thought you could play golf together.

JAY

We can still play golf.

SUE

You don't understand.  He'd have to introduce you to his golf partners.  You know.  As in: this is Sue's boyfriend.  He's whatever and his parents are something or other.  He wouldn't know what to fill in the blanks with.  That would be just too embarrassing for him.

JAY

I still don't see what this has to do with anything.  We're not going to be playing golf now that there is a foot of snow on the ground, so why are we talking about it?

SUE

We're talking about Christmas.

JAY

We are?  What has Christmas got to do with golf?

SUE

My dad would have to introduce you to the other family members who will be around here at Christmas.  He wouldn't know what to say.

JAY

Are you saying that you are ashamed of me?

SUE

Of course I'm not.  But you aren't my dad's kind of people.

JAY

But we love each other.  We can't break up simply because your father doesn't know how to make idle conversation.  You need to stand up for your rights.  For our rights.

SUE

It's not that simple.  Appearances are everything.

JAY

Does this mean we are breaking up?

SUE

At least until after Christmas.  I do love you, Jay, but I've got to have some other boyfriend for the sake of the family.

JAY

You mean you're going to start going with somebody else just for Christmas?

SUE

That's about it.  I can't be without a boyfriend, because he'd have to explain that.  He wants a nice neat picture-perfect daughter that causes him no worries.  But we can still see each other the rest of the time.

JAY

You mean I'd be your wrong-side-of-the tracks boy-toy?  No thanks.  If you're too ashamed to be seen with me then it's over.

SUE

Can I at least give you a ride home?

JAY

I don't need any favors from you or anyone else.  I'd rather walk.

Jay walks to the door - Sue follows him - Jay walks out.

CUT TO:

INT. STEVE'S APARTMENT -- NIGHT

STEVE

I'm sorry you've broken up with Sue You made such a cute pair.

(BEAT)

For a couple of straight people.

JAY

It's her father.  He considers me to be a second class citizen because I am a waiter.

STEVE

Well, aren't you?

JAY

A waiter is what I do.  It is not what I am.

STEVE

Do you miss the reserve?

JAY

There's nothing for me there.  And I can't get accepted here.  I want people to know about my native heritage.

STEVE

Wouldn't that freak George out?

JAY

Gracious.  I'd never tell him that.

Jay grins at Steve.  

JAY (CONT'D)

I'd sooner say I was gay.

STEVE (CHANGING THE SUBJECT)

Is that a Rolex?  I've never held one before.  Could I wear it for a while?

JAY (HANDING STEVE THE WATCH)

Sure.

STEVE

So then tell me.  What's your problem?  I kind of think of you as my little brother.

JAY

Thanks.  I'd think of you as my older brother if only you weren't . . .

STEVE

If I weren't what?

JAY

I'm so sorry.  I don't know what made me say that.  Sometimes my mouth doesn't seem to be connected with my brain.

STEVE

Forget it.  I should be used to that sort of thing by now, but it still gets to me.

(BEAT)

By the way, I have an extra ticket for a flight to San Francisco over Christmas week.  I got it for being top salesman for the year.

JAY

Lucky you.

STEVE

Could be lucky you, too, if you want.

JAY

You mean?

STEVE

Sure.  Why not.

JAY

That would be so great.  Without Sue there's nothing to keep me here.  Maybe I can look for my father there.  Mom said he always talked of going somewhere warm.

STEVE

I'd like being your tour guide.  I don't have any family to make me feel useful and needed.

JAY

You're beginning to sound like Phil.  What am I?  A surrogate son for everyone who needs someone to mother?

CUT TO:

INT. RED DRAGON RESTAURANT -- DAY

Two POLICEMAN officers sit at a table - Jay comes to serve them.

POLICEMAN

Is your name Jay?

JAY

Why do you want to know?

POLICEMAN

We ask the questions.  You give the answers.  Are you Jay?

JAY (WORRIED)

Yes, I am.  But I'm not saying anything more until you tell me what this is about.  I have rights, you know.

POLICEMAN

We're investigating a robbery.  We think you might know something about it.

JAY (RELIEVED)

You've got the wrong guy.  I'm strictly legal.

POLICEMAN

You know a Sue Parkington?

JAY

I guess so.  At least I used to.  You mean her place was broken into?

POLICEMAN

Would you mind showing us around your room upstairs?

JAY

You got a search warrant?

POLICEMAN

It would make it easier for all of us if you cooperate.  Unless, of course, you have something to hide.

JAY (CALLING TO THE KITCHEN)

Hey, Han.  I've gotta step out for a minute, okay?

CUT TO:

INT. JAY'S ROOM -- CONTINUOUS

The policemen search.

POLICEMAN

Empty your pockets and roll up your sleeves.

Jay pulls out his wallet - dirty handkerchief - keychain -  turns the pockets inside out.

JAY

Satisfied?

POLICEMAN

You wearing a watch?

Jay pulls up his shirt sleeves - bare wrists.

JAY

See.  There are no stolen goods here.  I've got to get back to work now, so you guys had better leave.

POLICEMAN

Not so fast.  Your girlfriend told you the code for the alarm system, didn't she?

JAY

Maybe they just forgot to turn the alarm on.

POLICEMAN

You'll need to make a statement.  You want to come down to the station on your own or do you want to come with us now?

JAY

I've got to make a living right now.  I'll go tomorrow.

POLICEMAN

That'll be fine.  But remember it's like American Express. 

(beat)

You know. 

(beat)

You can't leave town without it.

CUT TO:

INT. PHIL'S APARTMENT -- NIGHT

JAY

The cops think I did it because it had to be someone who knew the surveillance code

PHIL

Did you know the code?

JAY

Of course I did.  Sue always wanted me to turn it on when we went out.  She liked me to look after her that way.

PHIL

If you didn't do it then you have nothing to worry about.

JAY

Oh.  Yes I do.  I know who did it.  And it's all my fault.  I told him the code.

PHIL

Why would you do a thing like that.

JAY

Well, not in so many words.  We were talking one day and I used Sue's code as an example of how unimaginative people are in choosing them.  I had no idea he'd remember anything like that let alone use it.

PHIL

That doesn't prove he did it.

JAY

He gave me a Rolex a couple of days ago.  I'm so stupid.  I should have known right away that it was stolen.  I even knew that Sue's dad had a Rolex.

PHIL

That's not good.  If the policeman find it on you, you're dead meat.  As a minimum they'll have you for possession of stolen goods.  Let me see it.

JAY

Would you believe it's at Steve's?

PHIL

You're kidding.  Oh great.  We've got to get it back before Steve gets caught in the middle of this mess.

JAY

You're right.  But what will I do with it?  I can't give it to the police because then I'd have to say where I got it.  I'm not sending my buddy back to jail.

PHIL

If he's guilty then he has to take the consequences.

JAY

Maybe if I could convince him to give all the stuff back, then they'd go easy on him.

PHIL

I don't understand why you are so concerned about protecting a hoodlum like Tony.  He'll either hire a high-priced lawyer and get off, or he'll have one of his goons take the rap for him.

JAY

I'm not talking about Tony.  I'm talking about Jimmy.

PHIL

Jimmy?  You think Jimmy got away with a quarter of a million dollars in jewelry?

JAY

He gave me the Rolex.

PHIL

Sometimes I think it isn't safe to let you out of the house alone.

JAY

Maybe you could keep the watch for me, Phil.

PHIL

Sorry.  I'm not holding stolen goods for anyone.  You have to give it back to Jimmy.  He'll have to deal with it.

CUT TO:

INT. STEVE'S APARTMENT -- LATER

Jay, Phil and Steve sit in the living room.

STEVE

You guys want a drink?

PHIL

No thanks.  We just dropped in to pick up the watch that Jay left here by accident.  You know how easy it is for that to happen.

STEVE

Yeah, sure.

Steve gets the watch out from table drawer - gives it to    Jay.

STEVE (CONT'D)

That's a very fine piece of jewelry.  I'm surprised that you can afford luxuries like that.

JAY

Yeah, it's nice enough.  It's not hard to buy stuff on credit.

STEVE

Even if it's second-hand?

Steve looks sternly at Jay.

STEVE (CONT'D)

That watch must be at least ten years old.  I didn't know that you could buy stolen goods on credit.

PHIL

Drop it, Steve.  We don't have time for this right now.  Give him the watch and forget you ever saw it or us.  I'll explain later.

CUT TO:

INT. POLICE STATION -- MORNING

Jay walks into the policeman station.

The officer behind the counter looks up at Jay.

OFFICER

Identification, please.

Jay reaches into his pocket for his wallet - accidentally pulls out the watch - immediately shoves it back - hands the officer his open wallet.

OFFICER (CONT'D)

You're here to make a statement about the Parkington robbery?

JAY

That's right.  They told me I had to come down today.

OFFICER

Well, sir, this is your lucky day.  They caught the perp red-handed with the loot early this morning and he's safely locked up.  So we don't need anything from you right now.

DISSOLVE TO:

INT. MALL -- LATER

Jimmy is sitting alone at a table.  Jay walks in and sits down.

JAY

You're not in jail.

JIMMY

Should I be?

JAY

They told me that you were.

JIMMY

Well I'm not.  Who said I was?

JAY

Never mind.  If you're not in jail, then who is?

JIMMY

A lot of people, I would imagine, but I don't think that's our concern.  You do know you're not making any sense, don't you?  What's with you anyway?

JAY (SHONGT WATCH)

You stole this from Sue's place, didn't you?  Admit it.

JIMMY

You're crazy.  My grandfather gave me that watch a month ago.  He said that he felt guilty about having expensive possessions at a time when I was barely making enough money to keep my life together.  He says he came into this world with nothing and he'll go out with nothing, but he'd like the watch to be like a family heirloom. 

JAY

But you always need money.  Why don't you pawn it?

JIMMY

It wouldn't be fair to him to give it up like that.  He wanted it to be like a family heirloom.  I'm using you as an informal pawn shop.  This way I'll borrow money from you whenever I need it.  It cuts out the middleman, so to speak.  And it keeps the watch in the family.

JAY

So then are you're not really giving it to me?

JIMMY

Sure I am.  It's yours whether you loan me money or not.  We're buddies.  I'm trying to repay you for what you've done for me in the past.  And maybe prepaying you for what you might do for me in the future.

JAY

You're confusing me again.  Are you expecting something from me?

JIMMY

Of course not.  I don't want anything.  It's your friendship I value.

JAY

You wouldn't be upset if I pawned it to get some cash to go to San Francisco for Christmas with Steve, then?

Jimmy chews his bottom lip - looks down at the table.

JIMMY

I didn't know that you and Steve were . . . you know . . .  like . . . wanting to spend Christmas together.  Is that why you and Sue broke up?

JAY

Whoa, there.  You're dropping off the deep end.  If I do go with him, it's only because he has an extra free ticket.

JIMMY

Don't get up tight.  It's your life.

JAY

You're not suggesting that I'm gay, are you?

JIMMY

It seems that there is always something going on between you and Steve.  One never knows these days about who is what.

JAY

Trust me.  There's nothing between me and Steve.  You wouldn't believe how little there is between him and me.

JIMMY

But you're going to spend Christmas with him.  And in California, no less.

JAY

I'd be going for the trip to see if I can find my father there.  Steve did an Internet search.  There's Winston McNabb there.

JIMMY

There must be a lot of McNabb's.

JAY

This one lives on Nob Hill.  Get it?  My dad's called Nobby.  Besides that, my middle name is Winston.

JIMMY

I'd do anything to get to California.

Jay puts the watch on the table.

JAY

Here.  Pawn this then and buy yourself a ticket.

Jimmy pushes the watch back to Jay.

JIMMY

I couldn't go alone.  I'd be too afraid.

Jimmy stares into space for a few seconds.

JIMMY (CONT'D)

It's a nice dream, but that's all it can ever be.  Some things are better in the imagination than they would ever be in reality.  Send me a postcard.  That's the closest I'll ever get to California.

FADE TO:

EXT. OLD HOTEL A LA SAN FRANCISCO -- AFTERNOON

Jay and Steve are standing looking at the hotel.

JAY

Tell me again, why do you think that this a safe place for me to stay?

STEVE

Let me try to explain it.  Imagine you and I are in the woods together and we hear bears nearby.  You'd be afraid, right?

JAY

Of course.  We'd have to outrun the bear to escape.

STEVE

I wouldn't have to outrun the bear.

JAY

Why not?

STEVE

I'd only have to outrun you, and I can do that easily.  To be safe make sure you can outrun the person you are with.

JAY

So where are the bears in San Francisco?

STEVE

No bears.  But lots of predators.  You need to make sure there are easier targets that yourself for them.

JAY

Like what?

STEVE (POINTING)

See that bar?  With The hookers all around it?  They are more vulnerable than you for anyone looking to prey on the weak.

(beat)

And on this side there is that fancy hotel providing targets for anyone wanting to prey on the wealthy.

JAY

So I'm just a nobody.

STEVE

Exactly.  You are tougher than the hookers and obviously your pockets aren't bulging with money.  You are invisible.  If nobody notices you then you are safe.

JAY

Then why don't you gay guys just stay in the closet and be safe?

STEVE

Who wants to live in a closet?  Besides, being flamboyantly gay is a rush.  It gets attention.

JAY

I'm going up to Nob Hill.  I'll meet you here later.

CUT OUT:

EXT. LUXURIOUS GATED APARTMENT A LA NOB HILL  -- LATER

Jay pushes against the locked gate.  A stocky middle-aged Mexican calls from inside the gate.

MEXICAN

Can I help you, amigo?

JAY

I'm looking for someone that lives here.

MEXICAN

Are you sure this is the right address? We don't allow any peddlers here.

JAY

I'm looking for a Mr. McNabb.

MEXICAN

There is nobody by that name here.

JAY

The Internet said he lives here.

MEXICAN

I don't care who says it.  We no have anyone by that name here.

JAY

Darn. I've come all the way from Manitoba to find my father and you say you've never heard of him.

MEXICAN

Do you say Manitoba.  In Canada.

JAY

Yes.  You do know him?

MEXICAN

I worked with a man from there.  We knew him as Nobby.  He moved south.  Headed toward Mexico.

JAY

Do you have an address or anything?

MEXICAN

Wait here.  I have a letter from him.

The Mexican disappears into the apartment complex.  Returns with a worn letter.

MEXICAN (CONT'D)

We just knew him as Nobby.

He hands the letter to Jay. 

The camera zooms in on the letter as Jay begins to read it.

JAY

La Queresadore Ranch 1231 Alamore Pintata Road Solvang CA 93427 Hi Buddy -I lucked out getting a ride with a salesman going to L.A. He was stopping at all the small towns along the way so he took me right to Solvang. Everyone here is really nice. I'm living in their house trailer and there's lot's of room. You could stay here if you come to visit.

MATCH/MOVE

INT. SUE & JAY'S PLACE -- AFTERNOON

Sue and Jay sit on a sofa with Sue reading the letter.

SUE

They have guests all the time so they are looking for another worker - maybe you could come and get their faucets to quit leaking. You really should pack up and move here - the pay is good and they treat me like family. The phone number is 402 555 6215The weather here is great - It's a perfect place to live. They say there are rattlesnakes, but I haven't seen any. The annual tarantula migration apparently goes across their driveway, but that's only in November, and it doesn't last all that long. Tom says tarantulas are friendly things - they just get bad press.

I'm using my proper name now - Winston - so if you phone, ask for Winston.

Your old buddy, Nobby

Sue turns to Jay.

SUE (CONT'D)

Are you going to contact him?  

JAY

He's not that important to me.

Jay and Sue begin to make out.

DISSOLVE TO:

INT. R.B.'S ROOM -- EVENING

Jay enters.  He pauses at the wooden money bowl - takes a ten-dollar bill from his pocket - drops into the bowl.

R.B.

That is not necessary.

JAY

I owed you that.

R.B.

You owe me nothing.  I remember the time you needed money and my little bowl helped you.  That is why it is there.

JAY

I need to repay you.

R.B.

Do not return the money to me.  That would be like repaying a white man's loan.  You must give it to someone whose need is greater than your own.  Then the circle of respect will continue and maybe he will give it to someone else.  Thus the circle of respect continues.

JAY

I need advice.  I think I've found where my father is.

R.B.

You are afraid to meet him?

JAY

He's far away.

R.B.

If it is meant to be then it will happen.  The world will unfold around you.

JAY

Megwich.

DISSOLVE TO:

INT. SUE & JAY'S PLACE -- AFTERNOON

JAY

Let's pick up Jimmy and Tiffany and go to the park.

SUE

What brought that on?

JAY

It's too nice a day to be inside.  If we went to Assiniboine Park we could go to the zoo and the Conservatory and like that.

DISSOLVE TO:

EXT. ASSINIBOINE PARK -- LATER

Jay, Jimmy, Sue and Tiffany finish their lunch on the lawn.

JAY

Let's have a treasure hunt.

SUE

You can't just decide to have a treasure hunt.

JAY

Trust me.  We can.  Jimmy and Tiffany will help you.

SUE

What about you?  Aren't you going to be part of it?

JAY

I'll catch up with you.  I need to .  . . ah . . . go to the washroom.  You guys go ahead.  I'll look after the garbage.

SUE

OK.  But hurry.

Jimmy hands Sue a folded piece of blue paper.

JIMMY

Here's the first clue.

SUE

(reading)

To get your next clue use your brain.  Go chug along to the choo ...

The group walks across the lawn to the children's train ride - look around the miniature station - Sue notices a blue note pinned to the station wall.

TIFFANY

(reading the note)

Now join the creatures at the zoo.  Ask at the entrance for your clue.

The girl at the entrance wicket looks up from examining her nails.

SUE

Do you have a message for us?

The girl hands Sue a blue note.

SUE (CONT'D)

This garden's Mol is not small and furry.  Look for a big one.  No need to hurry.

(beat)

I don't get it.

TIFFANY

I bet it's the Leo Mol garden.  You know, where they have all those metal statues of his.

They wander among the statues - come to one of a bull carrying a girl on its horns.

Sue peeks behind the statue.

Jay is on one knee - holding out a ring.

JAY

Will you marry me?

SUE (STARTLED)

Jay.  What the ...

JAY

Will you marry me?

SUE (STARTLED)

Of course.

Sue gives Jay a big hug and kiss.

Jay slips the ring on her finger.

JAY

Now it's your move.  You get to chose the date.

SUE

I'll have to think about that.

Sue pretends to think.

SUE (CONT'D)

How's June 23rd sound?

Sue runs to show Tiffany and Jimmy the ring.

DISSOLVE TO:

INT. SUE & JAY'S PLACE -- AFTERNOON

Camera shot of calendar - August 15th

JAY

Are your folks all right with the wedding party?

SUE

Mom is.  Dad has a problem with Steve as best man.

JAY

Because he's gay?

SUE

He says his church doesn't accept gays in their congregation.

JAY

Is that true?

SUE

Probably not.  You know how homophobic he is.  He probably assumes everyone else is, too.

JAY

Is he suggesting we use a different church?

SUE

He'd never agree to that.  His family has always belonged to that same church.

JAY

Then what's the alternative?

SUE

As far as he's concerned, you get a different best man.

JAY

I won't let your dad choose my best man for me.  I'm trying to be cooperative, but Steve is going to be my best man.

SUE

What if he refuses?  After all, he is paying for the wedding and reception.

JAY

Then we go to Las Vegas.

SUE

You mean you'd elope with me?

JAY

In a minute.  This whole wedding thing is for your family, not mine.

SUE

Mom and Dad would be devastated to miss out on the wedding.

JAY

They could watch it on the Internet.

Sue looks puzzled.

JAY (CONT'D)

There are chapels in Los Vegas that send the wedding live over the Internet.  They could watch the whole thing as it happens.

SUE

Like all three minutes of it?

JAY

Maybe five.  There must be a better solution.  Does it have to be a church wedding?

SUE

I want us to be married by a minister.

JAY

Me too.  Maybe we could find a minister who would do it outside?

SUE

I'll have to talk to Mom about it.  That might be cool.

CUT TO:

Camera shot of calendar - February 7th.

JAY

How are the wedding and reception plans going?

SUE

Dad's accepted the idea of having the wedding in the park.  He's going to work out the details.

JAY

I thought he was staying as far out of the planning as possible.

He likes organizing things when he's in control.

JAY (CONT'D)

And the reception?

SUE

He needs a fancy place with lots of liquor, a big meal, an orchestra and all that sort of thing.

JAY

He gave me the wedding location.  I'll give him his reception where and how he wants it.

CUT TO:

Camera shot of calendar - March 15th.

SUE

I'm picked up the invitations today.

JAY

How do they look?

SUE (CAUTIOSLY)

Impressive.

JAY

You don't sound happy about it.  Is there something wrong with them?

SUE

It depends on your point of view.  Have a look.

Jay studies the invitation -  reads out loud.

JAY

The marriage of Susan Eleanor Parkington and Jason Winston May.  Who's this Jason May you're marrying?  Anyone I know?

SUE

It could be the printer's error?

JAY

That would make me Jay May.

SUE

It has a nice sound to it.

JAY

Oh sure.  Can't you just se me being introduced?  And this is Jay May.  Well, how do you do, Jamie?  And what's your last name, Jamie?

SUE

I'm sure he'd change that.

JAY

And what happened to my last name?

What happened to Maytwayashing?

SUE

He probably doesn't like the Indian sound of it.  I didn't want to upset you with these problems unless I had to.

JAY

Well, I'm afraid you'll have to.  This is my identity we are talking about.  I don't care what Shakespeare said, I wouldn't smell as sweet as a Jason.  I'm either Jay or Japheth.

SUE

I'm sure that's won't be a problem.

JAY

By the way, what name do you intend to use after we're married?

SUE

I'd like to drop mine and take yours.

JAY

But?

SUE

I didn't say there was a but.

JAY

There is no but?

SUE

Well, maybe a little one.

JAY

And that is?

SUE

Maytwayashing is a bit long for some people.

JAY

I'd rather have people pay attention to me instead of my name.

SUE

Does an Indian name help or hinder you in being accepted? 

JAY

I don't think it matters.  Indian people don't fit anywhere.  We have to make a place for ourselves.

SUE

Would your mother be upset if you gave up her name?

JAY

It won't be her name after she gets married.  She won't care one way or the other.

SUE

All you have to do, then, is choose a name you want to use.

JAY

Let's sleep on it.

SUE (teasing)

Always a good plan.

CUT TO:

Camera shot of calendar - March 23rd.

INT. OFFICE -- DAY

George is sitting across from a park OFFICIAL.

OFFICIAL

We don't allow wedding ceremonies in the Mol Garden.

GEORGE

Take me to your supervisor.

CUT TO:

Camera shot of calendar - June 23rd.

EXT. ASSINIBOINE PARK -- AFTERNOON

GEORGE (WORRIED)

It's going to rain.  I just know this wedding is going to be a disaster.  What will we do if it rains?  There's nowhere we can go if it rains.

HELEN

It's not going to rain.

GEORGE

You can't know that.

HELEN

It's like if you expect the worst, that's what will happen.  If you have faith then things will work out.  

GEORGE (INTERRUPTING)

Yes, yes.  I know.  But it's still going to rain.

HELEN

What is it the poet said?  The coward dies many times before his death; the valiant dies but once.

GEORGE

What's that have to do with anything?  We should have a tent set up in case of rain.  Will the park allow us to set up a tent?

HELEN

We can always go into the pavilion if it rains.

GEORGE

I never should have let you arrange this.  We should have hired someone.  Then it would have been done right.

HELEN

Trust me, George.  This will be a memorable wedding.

GEORGE

Is that what I want?

Two hundred folding chairs have been set up on the grass - a small podium set in front of a deer sculpture.

The guests are seated: guests of the bride on the left and right - ten seats for guests of the groom.

DISSOLVE TO:

EXT. ASSINIBOINE PARK -- CONTINUOUS

The MINISTER, Jay and Steve stand in front of the podium - excessive flowers everywhere.

The bridesmaids and groomsmen take their places - synthesizer MUSIC - procession begins with Tiffany as maid of honor.

George takes his seat.

From behind the trees at the front R.B. (in formal headdress and regalia) moves silently to stand beside minister.

Jay frowns turns - looks at Helen - she smiles and gives him a thumbs-up. 

Wisps of a sweetgrass smudge wafted over the wedding party.

R.B. stands motionless while the minister performs the ceremony.

R.B. steps  forward - places a traditional peace pipe into Jay's hands - puts Sue's hands on top of Jay's.

R.B.

You will share the same fire and hang your garments together.  You will help one another as you walk down the same trail of life.  You will look after each other.

R.B. removes the banner.

R.B. (CONT'D)

Be kind to one another.  Be kind to your children.

R.B. steps back.

MINISTER

You may now kiss the bride.

Synthesizer MUSIC - recessional.

CUT TO:

EXT. COUNTRY CLUB -- AFTERNOON

Reception on the lawns outside the Country Club - portable bars - trays of snacks - gloved waitresses.

Six native dancers in full dance costume - perform to the beat and singing of four native drummers. 

George moves between small groups of guests - studiously ignoring the dancers.

JAY (TALKING TO HELEN)

How did you manage to plan all this?

HELEN

R.B wanted to do something spiritual for you.

JAY (HUGGING HELEN)

You are the greatest ... mom.

CUT TO:

INT. COUNTRY CLUB -- EVENING

Guest are dancing in the ballroom.

Jay leafs through the Guest Book - stops suddenly - takes the book and rushes to Sue.

JAY

He was here.  Did you know about that?

SUE

Who?

JAY

My dad.

SUE

No way.  Let's check with Tiffany.  She was looking after the book.

Jay and Sue find Tiffany.

JAY

Did you see my dad?  What did he look like?  Is he still here?

TIFFANY

I didn't pay much attention.  There were so many people I didn't know.

JAY

You don't remember anything?

TIFFANY

Wait a minute.  He left a gift.  I remember now.  He wasn't sure what to do with it.  I bet I can find it.

CUT TO:

INT. COUNTRY CLUB -- CONTINUOUS

Tiffany, Jay and SUE search through the wedding gifts.

TIFFANY

Here it is.

Tiffany hands Jay a simply wrapped box with card attached.  Jay unwraps the box - almost drops it - lifts - out a wooden goblet with a wooden ring trapped on the stem - examines it.

SUE

That's so beautiful.  Hurry and read the card.

Jay tries to read the card to himself - chokes with emotion - hands it to Sue.

SUE(READING) (CONT'D)

Dearest Jay and Sue, Thank you for bringing me to your wedding.  I will never forget this kindness.  I apologize for not speaking to you, but I've never brought happiness to anyone whose path I've crossed.  I had no money to buy you a present, so I made this little gift for you from a single piece of wood from the bush behind my trailer.  With every wood chip that I carved, and every speck of dust as I sanded it, I offered my prayer that you will find the happiness together that has always eluded me.

Sue holds up the goblet - admires it.

SUE (READING) (CONT'D)

On each anniversary please share a drink from this glass, and pledge your love to each other.  Try not to judge me harshly.  I have tried, but I never seem to get anything right.  With all my love and best wishes for your happiness.  Nobby.

JAY

I'm amazed he came.

SUE

It was nice of you to send him a ticket.

JAY

I didn't send him a ticket.

SUE

Then who did.  You don't suppose ...

JAY

Who else?  He probably put Nobby on the payroll and wrote it off as a business expense.

CUT TO:

INT. COUNTRY CLUB -- EVENING

General wedding reception activities around Sue and jay.

CUT TO:

EXT. COUNTRY CLUB -- LATER

Jay and Sue are ushered by George and Helen into a limo - guests wave farewell to them.

CUT TO:

Close-up of George and Helen.

GEORGE (LOOKING PERPLEXED)

Who invited all those native people?  They aren't friends of ours, are they?

CAMERA ZOOMS OUT - PANS TO A HUGE OLD OAK TREE WITH AN EAGLE SITTING ON A DEAD BRANCH AT THE TOP OF THE TREE.

CAMERA ZOOMS IN ON THE EAGLE FOR A CLOSEUP OF THE EAGLE'S HEAD.

The eagle winks slowly and deliberately as the CLOSING CREDITS RUN.

The eagle glides off his perch, circles clowly a few times and then floats into the distance.

FADE TO BLACK:

THE END